Some more Shamshuipo

I’m still walking around…

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The streets are exhibitions waiting to speak.

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What would the stall say?

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What’s he thinking about?

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We’re all concealed by what we buy and sell.

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We all buy and sell.

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We’re all waiting.

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Until it’s all meat…

Camera: Olympus XA2

Film: Ilford XP2 400

On Looking

Sometimes it is the architecture of the city that teaches us how to look.

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We look up.

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We look again with a slight change of perspective.

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We glance from far away.

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A coordinated look.

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Look up, look down.

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We read.

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We wait and read and see.

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What does the look want?

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The look of friendship.

Camera: Contax TVS II

Film: Kodak BW400CN

Looking for Inspiration

Inspiration – that sudden realization.

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Some find it in trees.

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Others find it in rocks.

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Many find it in the interaction between the built and natural environment.

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There’s a biblical angle to inspiration, akin to revelation.

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What is the street asking of me these days?

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What is my street?

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Is it an impersonal grid?

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Is there a personality emerging?

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Where is the street these days?

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These are all reflections of our selves.

Camera: Leica M6

Lens: Voigtlander Nokton Classic 35mm f/1.4 SC

Film: Kodak BW400CN

Art of Buying

These are poses we adopt.

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We pause.

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We think.

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Should I?

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I want! I want!

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Do I need this?

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We have an expertise.

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We need a poultice.

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I need this.

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I want this.

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Yum.

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Buying, after all, is an art we’re good at.

 

 

Camera: Leica M6

Lens: Voigtlander Nokton Classic 35mm f/1.4 SC

Film: Kodak BW400CN

Changing Views

The geometry keeps changing.

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Hong Kong is a good place to be a flaneur.

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Take a step and the view changes itself.

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Lots to absorb.

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You could stand at the same spot.

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The landscape will change very quickly.

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It’s easy to enjoy the view.

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You seek out order to square the circles.

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Hong Kong will come to you.

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And so will the rest of the world.

 

Camera: Leica M6

Lens: Voigtlander Nokton Classic 35mm f/1.4 SC

Film: Ilford XP2 400

Geocaching and Street Photography

So, my ten-year-old son is into Geocaching.

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It’s basically a game where you hunt for hidden caches – you could then sign your name in the booklet in those canisters/boxes hidden or buried in various places in Hong Kong and the rest of the world.

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We’ve found magnetic canisters stuck behind signposts, or hidden under piled-up logs full of ants and spiders.

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You could then announce your success to the whole world and leave a few clues via the Geocache app.

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So you see, it’s killing two birds with one stone.

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I get to do a spot of street photography, and my son gets to do a bit of geocaching.

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That’s what I call father-son bonding.

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It doesn’t matter where I go as long as I’m on the streets.

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We could meander and come back to the same place – it doesn’t matter.

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Some people fish, others are into street photography, and of course, some are into geocaching.

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And we’ll have a late lunch after a morning of running back and forth.

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I suppose it’s another day in Hong Kong.

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We do what we can to preserve our sanity…

 

Camera: Leica M6

Lens: Voigtlander Nokton Classic 35mm 1.4 SC

Film: Kodak BW400CN

 

 

 

 

 

 

Singapore Speaks Monochrome

Singapore is a work in progress, and the physical landscape never fails to remind you of this.

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There could be cranes in the sky in built-up areas, and there could be views like the one below.

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Occasionally, it gets a bit postmodern, like this:

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The inside wants to be outside.

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Our desires/appetites/wants/needs are very well structured and catered to.

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Everything is for sale.

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Cities are places where appetites are met.

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Appetites transcend national boundaries …

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Pig organ soup, anyone? It’s actually quite yummy.

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Waiting.

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Doing.

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Working.

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Cooking.

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Buildings are structures of desires.

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There’s ambition in the architecture.

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These are homely desires.

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There’s an architecture of modernity.

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An architecture of nationhood.

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And space in which we simply do nothing at all.

Thanks for reading!

 

Open-edition prints are available at my Saatchi Art page.

 

 

 

 

 

Energetic City

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In the photograph, the energy of the city is called into question by the expressions of unwary individuals in candid moments. There is that utopian dimension to modernity, encapsulated in the proud sign “Energetic City”.

The city promises positive transformation even as the high rise buildings tower over and dominate its inhabitants. The deadpan expression of the father walking past the sign imparts the scene its irony, and the slightly suppressed hopeful countenance of the boy tells us he has yet to be properly socialised into a modern figure.

There is then a street wisdom that can be distilled. Because it purports to be easily grasped and navigated, the city projects itself as a child’s playground labyrinth, not unlike the one behind the sign. The father is too wise and world-weary to believe in the sign; in his rejection of this modern platitude, he has become an automaton. The automaton, we should say, is the proper response to the organised happy-clappy progressive modernity in which everything is supposedly understood and transparent.